Just-What-is-that-makes-today's-homes-so

Andrew Maughan

 

Just What is it that makes today's homes so different, 2016

Oil on canvas

240 x 180 cm

 

£7,000

20% will be donated to the NHS

Just What Is It… is a painting of the insert within an Ikea picture frame, and is exhibited alongside a houseplant bought from Ikea. The work is a comment on the commerciality of art, positioned in relation to the commerciality of Ikea, also acting as a critique on contemporary painting and of trends such as zombie-formalism.

Andrew Maughan (United Kingdom,1987) graduated from Northumbria University in 2009, where he received a first class BFA with honours. Maughan’s artworks interrogate humour, the contemporary political landscape, class culture and the media that amplifies them. Drawing on histories of vanitas painting and monumental portraiture, Maughan invests the simple tropes of cinema, street, and summer holiday with surreal humour. The London based artist is currently a Royal Academy of Arts student where he is completing his MA. His works have been extensively exhibited in the UK: London, Glasgow, Liverpool, Newcastle, Birmingham, Manchester, Blackpool and also in Detroit, USA. Recent exhibitions include Premiums at the Royal Academy in London (2020), and The Return of The Great Assassin at NewBridge Project (2019).

Return-of-the-Great-Assassin-(1)---Photo

Andrew Maughan

Big Exit, 2019

Oil on canvas

130 x 100 cm

 

£4,000

20% will be donated to the NHS

 

Andrew Maughan’s Great Assassin series has taken on new significance since the outbreak of the Covid-19 coronavirus. Composed around the fictional character of the ‘Great Assassin’, inspired by the Zodiac Killer, Maughan’s paintings originally sought to address the role of the media in generating public fear and paranoia, and the political consequences therein. Depicting situations in which the sinister is consistently undermined by the mundane, Maughan’s works question the faceless enemies half-invented by tabloids, calling on tropes of Russian spies and murder.

 

Works addressing passivity in the face of climate change now speak to experiences of lock-down and social distance; notions of an invisible enemy more pertinent than ever. At a time when all intimate connection is mediated by technology, and we see nature flourish in once tourist-heavy cities, Maughan’s brand of moral ambiguity maintains its power.