Willem-Weismann--problems-at-breakfast,-

Willem Weismann

 

Problems At Breakfast, 2019

Oil on canvas

95 x 80 cm

 

£5,000

20% will be donated to the NHS

Willem Weismann (Netherlands, 1977) has been living in London (UK) since 2003. He studied at ArtEZ Institute for the Arts, Arnhem (NL) from 1997 to 2002 and Goldsmiths College, London (UK) from 2003 to 2004.

 

Discovering what lies behind a facade, or beneath our feet beyond the smooth surface of the pavement, is a central motif in Weismann’s work. His works depict absurd urban environments; various rooms cluttered with debris of contemporary life and the excess of consumerism. Bathed in a beautiful light, these vibrant scenes in chromatic hues are at once eerily familiar and unsettling, confronting us with the direct aftermath of our existence.

Often Weismann uses the canvas as his painting palette to mix his paints and incorporates this into the work itself.

Weismann was awarded with the East London Painting Prize in 2015. He has had solo exhibitions at the Zabludowicz Collection, London (UK); Grimm Gallery (Netherlands); The Nunnery gallery, London (UK); Galeria Quadrado Azul, Porto (PT); and Museum voor Moderne Kunst, Arnhem (NL).

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Problems-at-Breakfast,-95-x-80-cm,-oil-o
 
Willem-Weismann--w,-55-x-45-cm,-oil-on-c

Willem Weismann

 

𝓌, 2019

Oil on canvas

55 x 45 cm

 

£2,700

20% will be donated to the NHS

About his painting 𝓌 Weismann explained: “I only read this quote after making many of the 'neon' paintings, but I thought it was very appropriate. When the English playwright George Bernard Shaw visited Broadway and 42nd street in New York in the twenties and saw neon signs for the first time he said : 'It must be beautiful, if you cannot read.'

The neon paintings show the back sign of a neon. The letters are only partly visible and it's not clear what the complete text or 'message' is.

It's also for me a portrait of a city, but just reduced to shape and colour.

Like most people I don't really know how a neon sign works or what it looks like from the other side, so I just make it up each time. It doesn't have much to do with reality, it becomes an abstract play with form and colour. In this way I want to show that things are often more complicated than they seem, even a single letter is constructed of many parts. It's also a comment on how in our lives today, we are surrounded by many complex objects (phones, laptops, etc..) that we use but have no idea how they work or are made.”

Willem-Weismann--w,-55-x-45-cm,-oil-on-c